Temple of Abydos

Temple of Abydos

Abydos was Ancient Egypt’s most important burial center. Although the archaeology site here is vast, the main tourist attraction most people center their visit around is the beautiful Temple of Seti I.

Considered one of the most important archaeological sites in Egypt, the sacred city of Abydos was the site of many ancient temples, including Umm el-Qa’ab, a royal necropolis where early pharaohs were entombed. These tombs began to be seen as extremely significant burials and in later times it became desirable to be buried in the area, leading to the growth of the town’s importance as a cult site.

Temple of Dendera

Temple of Dendera

The Temple of Hathor at Dendera is largely believed to be one of the best preserved temple of its kind in all of Egypt. It is a vast structure covers more than 40,000 square meters, and it stands directly above older buildings dating back to the time of the pyramids of Cheops and Khufu of the 4th dynasty. The Temple of Dendara is one of the best-preserved temples in Egypt. It was known as the “Castle of the Sistrum” or “Pr Hathor”— House of Hathor.

Luxor Temple

Luxor Temple

Luxor Temple might be the greatest testament to why Luxor has earned its nickname, “The World’s Largest Outdoor Museum”. Luxor Temple is located in the modern city of Luxor, which is built on the site of the ancient Egyptian capital of Thebes. The Luxor Temple was constructed of sandstone blocks from Nubia. The temple is surrounded by mud-brick walls which symbolize the separation between the world and the sacred realm of the gods. The Temple’s design during the New Kingdom exhibited a set of common design features in the construction of the temple. The Luxor Temple displays many of the features typical of temple construction known during the New Kingdom.

The Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatchepsut

The Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatchepsut

The Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, also known as the Djeser-Djeseru (Holy of Holies), is a mortuary temple of Ancient Egypt located in Upper Egypt. Built for the Eighteenth Dynasty pharaoh Hatshepsut, who died in 1458 BC, the temple is located beneath the cliffs at Deir el-Bahari on the west bank of the Nile near the Valley of the Kings. This mortuary temple is dedicated to Amun and Hatshepsut and is situated next to the mortuary temple of Mentuhotep II, which served both as an inspiration and, later, a quarry. It is considered one of the incomparable monuments of ancient Egypt.

Valley of The Kings

Valley of The Kings

The Valley of the Kings also known as the Valley of the Gates of the Kings is a valley in Egypt where, for a period of nearly 500 years from the 16th to 11th century BC, rock-cut tombs were excavated for the pharaohs and powerful nobles of the New Kingdom (the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Dynasties of Ancient Egypt

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